Book Review: Paternus: Wrath of Gods by Dyrk Ashton

wrath of godsFormat: oversized paperback, first edition, 2018

Pages:  511 (not counting appendices and bonus material)

Reading Time:  about 12.5 hours

One Sentence Synopsis:  As Fi and Zeke discover more about who they really are, they continue to be swept up in the battle between the Deva and Asura – but a bigger, deadlier threat emerges that may bring about the prophesied “End of the World”.

 

I will admit I was pretty critical in my review of the first book in the Paternus series, Rise of Gods, but I saw enough promise (and received some inspiring input from RockStarlit BookAsylum), so I decided to spring for the sequel. I was specifically looking to see if the questions I had from the first book would be answered, or if they would go unexplained and kill some of the major plot points. After reading Paternus: Wrath of Gods, I have my answer. You’ll have to read on to get my take, but spoilers of this book (and of the first) may be present – you have been warned. But first, some guest reviews from the Web…

 

RockStarlit BookAsylum (still owning the coolest blog name ever) says: “It’s a hell of a roller coaster ride, one which you can’t get enough of. The events are picked up right at where they were left at the end of Rise of Gods. If you don’t remember everything that happened in that book, don’t you worry, Mr Ashton was kind enough to provide a short summary for you. Unless in Rise of Gods, in this book we only follow two groups of characters, which makes things much easier. I also had less problem to adjusting to the present tense, which can be quite annoying at first, but after a few pages I completely forgot about it and just let the flow carry me on. We also get a lot less info dumps, or they are offered in a better way which actually makes it bearable. Although in some cases the info dump totally break the pace of a fight scene making it longer than necessary. A lengthy description of a weapon during a fight might not be the best idea. In Wrath of Gods the stakes are getting higher, and if you thought it’s impossible to dig up even more mythological creatures, then think again. Dyrk Ashton has some more of them up in his sleeves and not afraid to use them. And play with your emotions too while he is at it. With books like this where a lot happens in a short period of time and have a huge cast of characters one of the problems can be the lack of character building. Or more like the lack of place/time for character building…Fi and Zeke also get their moments, but I still feel that them and Peter are the less developed characters compared to some of the others. I like Fi’s fierceness and strong personality and it was interesting to see as she comes in terms with her heritage. And I’m looking forward to see how she copes with the current situation in the next book. Zeke… find it hard to come to terms with him. It feels like that he is mostly just along for the ride, giving away his knowledge. But then, some of the most interesting scenes belonged to him.

J.C. Kang of Fantasy-Faction states: “The first half of the book reminds me of the old adage about travel broadening the mind, with the caveat of having to survive. The main characters split off on their own adventures, where they develop their powers and discover their heritage. Bitten by the spider, Max, Fi learns what it means to be Firstborn—the ability to understand all languages, endurance, strength, etc. She has to unlearn everything she thinks she knows about herself, with the guidance of Peter and her Firstborn siblings. Zeke continues to be an enigma, with an underlying intrigue—not being Firstborn, there are so many things he should not be able to do, such as slip; and more impressively, pick up a weapon that even Firstborn cannot…It raises a larger question: while to humans, the Firstborn could be considered gods, there is room left for capital-G God. Older Firstborn relate to visiting Christ during his lifetime (and indeed, they fit into the biblical Three Wise Men story), and Fi’s uncle, Galahad, clearly believes in God, despite knowing of Peter. The plot moves along at a good pace along three main story lines, as we are introduced to more Deva and Asura. Like in Empire Strikes Back, where we learn there is a bigger, badder evil than Darth Vader, we find out that the behind book one puppet master Claron is someone even worse. Not only that, but it appears that Earth might have an expiration date. My main complaint of book one was the head-hopping feel of the present tense omniscient viewpoint. This was not a problem in book two. Perhaps I grew accustomed to it in book one, but I do feel Ashton smoothed out the transitions between character thoughts, making it easier to follow.

Finally, Petrik Leo of Novel Notions opines: “If you love the exposition of the mythologies in the first book but found it too info-dumpy, Ashton did a better job here in ensuring that the pacing of the story does not suffer from the same. My favorite newest inclusion in this regard was the importance of Hinduism for the plotline. Whether it’s the cosmic calendar, Ganesha, or Nagalok, the integration of the myths into the narrative never ceased to intrigue me…In the first book, although Zeke and Fi were the main characters, their presence was overwhelmed by Peter; I loved how this book changed that perception. We finally get more revelations around Zeke and Fi and the immense significance of their roles. Plus, their personalities were so much more fleshed out. The entire part two of the novel, or what I would say are the chapters which divulged Zeke’s background, for instance, was easily my favorite section. It was wholly engaging, a non-stop page turner, and unpredictable. Part three slowed down in pace as the narrative prepares for the big conclusion in the coming finale. Don’t give up too quickly easily on this series if you find yourself struggling through the first one-third of the first book — I disliked that part too. Dyrk has grown a lot as an author, professionally and writing-wise, since then. I do, however, have to admit that the book took some time for me to get used to despite the great pacing and compelling story. This is because of my personal issue with the narrative style that occasionally utilizes paragraphs to shift character perspectives, instead of chapters.

 

My Thoughts:

There were several issues I had with Paternus: Rise of Gods: a big plot hole, “unbeatable” immortals that rob the story of tension, an awkward third person present tense narrative, immortals that lack clear motivations, shallow “mortal” viewpoint characters who lack agency, and a bucketful of unanswered questions. Let’s address these one at a time:

  • The big plot hole was isolated to the first book. Though the effects of that plot hole will be present throughout the series, I didn’t find any major new plot holes in Wrath of Gods, so that’s a positive.
  • Unbeatable immortals? Well, that’s still kind of true, although this book expands on a threat from the first book, cybernetic insects that can kill immortals, so it adds a lot more tension here, since now it seems anyone could perish at any time.
  • The third person present tense narrative is still present, but perhaps I’m getting used to it as it didn’t bother me quite as much. As J.C. Kang says, it feels like Ashton improved transitions between viewpoints.
  • Most immortals still lack motivation, except when it comes to saving the world…otherwise we have no insight into why they feel and act the way they do. There are a few exceptions (such as Galahad).
  • The shallow mortal viewpoint characters, Fi and Zeke, get a bit more of their backstory revealed, which gives them a little more depth. Early in the story, they are still reacting to events, but towards the middle of the book they began to have agency, so that’s a positive, too.
  • Many of the questions I had in the first book have now been explained. While there are a few questions that have gone unanswered, overall Ashton has done a splendid job of avoiding what could have been inexplicable plot devices.

The pacing of Wrath of Gods is excellent. The plot careens from one action sequence to another, and as before, Ashton proves adept at handling battles, chases, and action-packed scenes. There is a spot in the middle of the book where things slow down a bit as the Deva gather for a meeting of the minds. It feels a little out of place – almost like having a party as the world is in danger of being destroyed – and there are some big info dumps going on. However, I will admit I loved reading about the Cosmic Calendar – that is pretty cool. When I told a friend about this at my workplace (he is originally from India), he was impressed that the Cosmic Calender was in the book and wanted to know what I was reading.

Spoiler Alert!!! Skip to next paragraph if necessary! I do still have a few questions I want to see answered…how did so many of the cybernetic insects get made? Why is Earth the “last world standing”? Why do Lucifer’s schemes line up with the Cosmic Calendar…is it predestination, or simply coincidence? How do God & Jesus fit into the Deva structure – or do they? Do angels such as Michael and Gabriel exist in this setting? When the immortals pray, who are they praying to? Lots of questions I hope will be answered in the third book.

One thing that I thought was cool was that Lucifer and Satan (Kleron) are not the same being. This actually fits with some Christian theology in which Satan was the angel that fell from heaven and became the Devil, while Lucifer was the king of Babel.

Some of the best parts of the book involve tongue-in-cheek sexual humor. It’s becoming clear that Fi and Zeke are probably going to become a thing, so it’s great fun to see the less-inhibited immortals like The Prathamaja Nandana toy with Fi about “closing the deal” with Zeke and pretending having interest in Zeke just to get Fi’s hackles up.

My favorite part was the appearance of Ganesha, who is probably my favorite immortal in real life, as I have 3 different Ganesha statues in my library. Some other new characters are introduced, and a couple fall by the wayside. We also see some interesting artifacts make an appearance, including one that Kleron uses to control the cybernetic insects.

In conclusion, I enjoyed Wrath of Gods immensely, far more than Rise of Gods. With even more action, stellar pacing (except for one scene), better character development, some questions answered, and more danger leading to more tension, this book is superior to the first in every way, and at times had that “just one more chapter” feel. I’m excited for the next release, Paternus: War of Gods, which is slated for release on May 19, 2020.

3 thoughts on “Book Review: Paternus: Wrath of Gods by Dyrk Ashton

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