Status Update 6-12-19

A couple of days ago I finished Robin Hobb’s Fool’s Quest. The word “finished” might be a little too underwhelming – I absolutely devoured this book. The Pages Read Count for the year is now 6124. Amazon told me that Cameron Johnston’s God Of Broken Things would be delivered by the 12th (today), and since I wanted to get started on it I decided to take a break for a couple of days from reading instead of starting and stopping something else. Instead, I finally managed to finish my review of The Siege of Abythos, and I’m getting started on the review for The Wrath of Heroes, which I hope to complete by early next week…

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Book Review: The Siege of Abythos by Phil Tucker

siege of abythos

Format: oversized paperback, self-published first edition, 2016

Pages: 719

Reading Time: about 17 hours

One Sentence Synopsis: As a war is fought on two fronts, Asho, Kethe, Iskra, Audsley, Tiron, and Tharok cross paths when the Empire struggles against corruption within, and also against from Tharok’s forces that lay siege in an epic attempt to seize of the fortress of Abythos.

 

At the conclusion of The Black Shriving, Phil Tucker’s previous entry in the Chronicles of the Black Gate, I thought that The Siege of Abythos could be outstanding if Tucker managed to maintain tension, reveal secrets, and develop characters while avoiding plot predictability. So was Tucker able to accomplish this in The Siege of Abythos? Read on to find out, but be prepared for spoilers for this book as well as the previous entries. First, here are a couple of guest reviews from cyberspace…

 

Calvin Park of Fantasy Book Review writes: “The world building in this series continues to be unique and intriguing in multiple ways. The way that the religious system interweaves with the concrete functioning of the world is believable and absolutely fascinating. In this third book in the series, we get more clarity around the magic system (though also plenty that has yet to be revealed) and we get to see even more of the world itself. To me, it felt like plot, characters, and setting all really coalesced in this novel. We’re definitely in the thick of things now in terms of plot and Tucker has done a stupendous job of keeping the plot fast moving while constantly developing new threats and new twists. The sense of development here is nearly off the charts. Every character is different at the end of the novel compared to the beginning. Every plot thread has been moved forward or wrapped up in a way that actually shifts things and moves another thread forward…There was, however, one aspect of the novel that just did not hit for me. Kethe’s arc felt very out of character, in a lot of ways. To begin, she spends the vast majority of the novel being reactive and doing exactly what she’s told to do with little defiance. This just felt so unlike Kethe from the previous novels. I believe we’re meant to understand that she had some sort of a spiritual experience which leads to this, but it didn’t seem that way to me. It felt like our defiant, fiercely driven Kethe was inexplicably compliant and going through the motions. The brief glimpses we received of the old Kethe were primarily instances where she was just being mean because other people weren’t as compliant as she was…The Siege of Abythos is filled with fast moving, twisting plots and loyalties with an amazing cast of characters. Tucker’s Chronicles of the Black Gate is quickly becoming one of my absolute favorite epic fantasy series.

J. C. Kang of Fantasy Faction states: “So, now back to the original premise of my review, which is that the dogma of Ascendency is just a tool for control. Of course, just three books in, this is only my reader theory; but our favorite Kragh Warlord, Tharok, pretty much lays out how religion can be used to manipulate followers, and even goes about creating his own to those ends. Tharok isn’t the only fictional L. Ron Hubbard, either. As with the previous two books, the worldbuilding in this installment is deliciously detailed, and we start The Siege of Abythos at polar opposites: the slave mines of Bythos, and the stone cloud of Aletheia. As our heroes go about their individual missions, we are steeped deeper into the culture that Ascendancy propagates, and learn just how deeply it is ingrained, even in those it subjugates. The contrast of these two societies at the opposite end of ascension is marvelous. The black market and crime syndicates that operate within the enslaved population of Bythos is reminiscent of mafia and triads that subjugated but also supported immigrant communities in America; and we experience it through the eyes of Asho, now an outsider to his own people, as he navigates this minefield, all the while being torn between his loyalty to Iskra and his love for his sister Shaya. Magister Audsley is no stranger to being a fish out of water, the awkward scholar always fought to fit in among the knights and warriors; but in book three, he must face a new challenge in the pretentious upper class of Alathea. A reader cannot help but to hold Tucker’s creation of this society in awe: from the subtle symbolism of colors in the layers of robes someone wears, to the metaphorical language reminiscent of Chinese proverbs (real ones, not the kind you get in fortune cookies), and poetry duels that put epic rap battles in downtown L.A. to shame. If you saw Sokka’s haiku fight in the Last Airbender, yeah, it’s that awesome. These societies, as well as Agerastos, serve as a stage for our beloved characters. Many of us watched with bated breaths as romantic couples formed by the end of The Black Shriving: Iskra and Tiron, and Asho and Kethe. Yet, with three books to go, they could not yet enjoy a Happily Ever After ending. Instead, duty tears both couples apart, but with that comes new strength of character and power.

 

The Siege of Abythos is not only the middle book in the series – a total of 5 books comprise The Chronicles of the Black Gate, and The Siege of Abythos is the third book – but it also “feels” like a middle book. It’s not surprising, then, that it suffers a bit from “middle book syndrome”. It is certainly the thickest book of the series, coming in at 719 pages, and while this affects pacing a bit, it’s not too detrimental to the story. It does help move the plot from a place where all the characters were off doing their own thing, to the decisive siege that brings Tharok into contact with some of the others, neatly tying formerly disparate storylines together in a tidy package.

In The Black Shriving, there was a big emphasis on world building and character growth, while the plot was a bit predictable, and there were many unanswered questions about the way things work, specifically Ascension, the Black Shriving, and the Black Gate. In The Siege of Abythos, none of those questions are really answered, there still aren’t many plot twists, and the characters at times seem to be spinning their wheels while they wait for events to affect them rather than driving the action themselves. The exception is Tharok, who has gotten himself trapped between a rock and hard place, trying to placate his people while playing to the medusa’s ego as she consolidates power in an attempt to subjugate his entire race. It goes without saying that any success that Tharok enjoys feels like it will be short-lived. He begins to not only physical suffer from the effects of the circlet, but also his people are now suffering from the callous decisions he makes while wearing it. Yet he doesn’t dare remove it for any length of time, lest all of his plans fall apart and the medusa enslaves all of the Kragh.

Multiple environments in the worldbuilding are explored, from the heights that Kethe and Audsley are embroiled in (with poetry wars and gladiator-like combat), to the mines and city of Bythos, where we get a peek into Asho’s roots, to the walled fortress of Abythos where a massive battle takes place. Tucker’s worldbuilding continues to be the most outstanding feature of the series. The map at the front of the book is less than helpful, though, as it doesn’t really give a good impression of Tharok’s lands and its relation to Abythos, nor where Abythos is in relation to Bythos.

Meanwhile, Asho struggles to free his people, many of whom are content to entrust their fate to Tharok. Asho’s sister Shaya becomes a fleshed-out character (in the past she was only in Asho’s memories). Iskra struggles to maintain power in the fragile Agerasterian society, making sacrifices that are distasteful and tragic. For poor Tiron, who has been through so much torment already, this feels like a death-blow. But he ends up moving on to a new purpose, and his storyline becomes, dare I say, second only to Audsley’s when it comes to being compelling. Wyland, who was once such an important character to me, continues his slide into oblivion, a victim of religious dogma that turns him into something despicable. And speaking of Audsley, he continues to have the most compelling and wonderfully written pages devoted to his efforts. When he fails, he fails badly, but still somehow manages to find solutions that overcome his problems. Finally, I agree with Calvin above that Kethe becomes a bit boring and she becomes the least-compelling character.

Early on we get a glimpse of the White Gate through Kethe’s eyes. What is this mysterious white light? And how do the multitude of demons near the White Gate manage to not be destroyed by its presence and power? And what the heck is Ascension, really…is it a lie as Iskra believes, or is it true and has been corrupted by the actions of a select few, or perhaps the truth lies somewhere in between? There are many more questions raised than answers given, which is surprising for a book of this size. I’m willing to push those answers out a bit further, but when combined with answers still pending from previous books, I’m concerned that they might never be revealed. I guess I’ll have to take a “wait and see” attitude until I get through the final 2 books.

The battle scenes are done fairly well as compared to previous books, and the siege itself is pretty awe-inspiring in regards to its scale, although I did struggle at times to picture the layout of the fortress accurately…a little more description of aspects of the layout in relation to other aspects is sorely needed at times. Another question I had that was quite puzzling to me was that in Bythos and Abythos, the Black Gate is fairly close. In the previous story it was established that Asho draws his power from the Black Gate, but he is practically powerless despite his constant proximity to it. I found this plot point convenient for the sake of the plot. Perhaps it was explained somewhere why this was the case, but I’m afraid I missed it somehow.

In conclusion, despite suffering from middle book syndrome, in The Siege of Abythos Tucker continues to offer up intrigue and compelling characters, along with excellent worldbuilding, that carry the series forward. I’m really hoping all my questions get answered in the next two books, and until then I’ll give Tucker a pass on keeping me in the dark. While the plot is a bit predictable, the characters often end up far from where they started, and that is a good thing. I really enjoyed The Siege of Abythos and hope Tucker can continue to build the momentum established, answer some of the burning questions I have, and throw in some plot twists to keep me guessing…

Status Update 6-4-19

Last week I completed reading James Islington’s An Echo Of Things To Come. The Pages Read Count for the year is now 5370. I’m now well into Robin Hobb’s Fool’s Quest, another doorstopper at 754 pages. Next up will be Cameron Johnston’s God Of Broken Things, which Amazon states is 432 pages. This will be a welcome respite from a bevy of massive tomes, because queued up after that is Brandon Sanderson’s Words of Radiance, which is over 1000 pages.

I had originally thought that reading The Siege of AbythosThe Wrath of HeroesAn Echo of Things to ComeFool’s Quest, and Words of Radiance would take me until the end of August to read; despite the fact that God Of Broken Things has been added in as well, I’m a bit more optimistic now that I might finish by the end of July, a month earlier than expected, which would be fantastic. If only I could keep up with the reviews!

Status Update 5-30-19

God of Broken Things

Last year, Cameron Johnston’s The Traitor God was one of my favorite books and earned multiple Hippogriff Awards, including a tie for the top book of the year. I’m used to waiting for a few years for a sequel, so I’m amazed that Amazon is telling me that my copy of Johnston’s God of Broken Things, the follow-up to The Traitor God, will be here between June 17-21. Since I’m almost finished with An Echo of Things to Come, I’ll be tackling Robin Hobb’s Fool’s Quest in the next day or two, and by the time that’s finished, God of Broken Things should be arriving, so I will be able to read it immediately.

Unfortunately I’m still under a time crunch due to warm weather activities, so I’m not even close to being ready to post reviews of The Siege of Abythos or The Wrath of Heroes yet…

Book Review: Arm of the Sphinx by Josiah Bancroft

arm of sphinxFormat:  oversized paperback, first trade paperback edition, 2018

Pages:  398

Reading Time:  about 9 hours

One sentence synopsis: Thomas Senlin and his crew look for a safe place to hole up as Senlin moves closer to finding his wife, but danger soon throws them into the path of the mysterious and god-like figure known as the Sphinx.

 

Last year, Josiah Bancroft’s Senlin Ascends blew me away…his imaginative world dripped with fantastic imagery and elegant prose that in my mind made it a literary classic, and was one of my favorite stories of all time. I approached this sequel with a mix of excitement and trepidation: the bar had been set high by the first book…could Arm of the Sphinx possibly live up to my lofty expectations? Read on to find out, but first here’s a look at some other reviews from around cyberspace…

 

James Tivendale of Fantasy Book Review states: “There are a larger number of point of view perspectives in the Arm of the Sphinx than in the previous entry. Written in the 3rd person, the characters we follow in addition to Senlin are the one-armed and trustworthy first mate Edith, the inquisitive and adventurous Voleta, her engineer and perhaps untrustworthy brother Adam, and finally, Iren who previously acted as a bouncer/bodyguard within one of the Ringdom’s seedy criminal underworld. The character development is excellent and the above-mentioned members of The Stone Cloud really grow and shine and they are no longer merely side characters in “The Thomas Senlin Show.” We are introduced to these characters’ personal thoughts and feelings which adds heightened affinity and I truly cared about each of these very different individuals. Bancroft writes an exquisite mix of fantasy and steampunk. As further mysteries of the Tower unfold science-fiction elements are introduced and merge seamlessly. The world-building is brilliant and totally unique. The grandiose and labyrinthine Tower is arguably the main character in this series and in this novel new Ringdom’s are introduced for the first time including the Silk Gardens. Each of the Tower’s many Ringdom’s is the size of a city and they all have great differences aesthetically, socially and politically. The only common denominator is that they can all present an extreme degree of danger.

Writer Dan from Elitist Book Reviews opines: “There were two aspects of the novel, however, that significantly detracted from the goodness of the book. The first you might have already guessed: point of view. Instead of the focused, driven, single (overwhelmingly) perspective of Tom Senlin we got in SENLIN ASCENDS, nearly every secondary character that calls Tom a friend got POV time, and there were even a few others that never even met the man. The main difficulty with this is that none of these various characters had anywhere near the motivation, drive, or persona of Tom Senlin, and so this diluted the story significantly. Additionally, there were egregious examples of head-jumping, which I just can’t abide…The second issue that really made me lose some of my steam for the book was the ending. With the title of the book being “Arm of the Sphinx” I fully expected that Edith would be a focus of the story, and she was. In my opinion, her POV was the only one that was justified though, and she should have gotten considerably more attention in the story. All of the others but Tom could have been removed, and it would have made the books much the better. With all the resulting dilution of the story, however, the ending really kind of fizzled for me, and it ended up feeling very much like the second book in a trilogy, or more directly: a setup novel for the final book. Granted, it was only the ending that made me feel this way. So much of the adventure of the entire book was exactly what I’d been looking for. With a lot more focus and energy, this book could have been just as good as its predecessor.

Finally, Dorian Hart of dorianhart.com writes: “First, the sentence-crafting is every bit as good as in Senlin Ascends. Bancroft’s sublime artistry with imagery and metaphors is on full display, making the story a joy to read on its lowest level. I found myself stopping to take notes on particularly lovely turns of phrase, which is not something I typically do while reading…It did feel to me like the author couldn’t quite bring himself to commit either to 3rd-person limited or true 3rd-person omniscient narration, and I did find the head-hopping to be distracting at times. Changes in POV sometimes felt haphazard and unexpected. But the story’s willingness to break its single-lead-character shackles was more a strength than a weakness; it allowed the author to treat us a tale of wider scope and at the same time give us wonderfully detailed characterizations. Of all the types of virtuosity on display in Arm of the Sphinx, my favorite was the author’s ability to present complex physical action with an almost uncanny clarity. I am reminded of a particular scene where [very minor spoiler] a character is trapped in a submerged boat by a monster, and the action could have been extremely confusing to follow in the hands of a less savvy author. But Bancroft made it so easy to follow the complexities of the scene, I never had to pause to reorient myself. All of his action sequences are like that – complex but clear. It’s a rare skill.

 

As the other reviewers have explained above, Arm of the Sphinx is very different from its predecessor. Where Senlin Ascends focused on Thomas Senlin’s point of view, his dogged, straight-line pursuit in search of his wife, and introducing the setting that is the weird and wonderful Tower, in contrast the sequel presents multiple points of view, drifts a bit and at times lacks clear direction, and instead of focusing on the setting of the Tower, instead begins to reveal some of the secrets behind it, much like the curtain being pulled back in The Wizard of Oz to reveal the true nature of the Wizard. In essence, it almost feels as though Bancroft abandoned his original plot and viewpoint to explore other ideas. At times, Arm of the Sphinx is better for it; at others, it suffers because of it.

The analogous phrasing that I loved so much from the first book is more subdued here, but the prose and descriptions are still absolutely stellar. At the beginning of each chapter, Bancroft presents sayings captured from books or other accounts that related to people or events in the tower. It offers a glimpse into the Tower’s past, which is expanded upon by the musings of the Sphinx, a mythical, god-like creature which is part of the mystery revealed as I highlighted above.

Whether or not the differing viewpoints are a benefit or detraction is a matter of personal taste. I enjoyed learning more about Edith, Adam and Voleta…their perspectives allow for a much wider look at the Tower and its denizens than what the single-minded Senlin provides. On the other hand, Senlin’s undaunted purpose, his influence on others, and his cleverness, which drove the first book to incredible heights, are largely absent here. When added to an unintended bout with a chemical substance, as well as Senlin’s wife Marya (who I loved in the first book) being largely portrayed as a negative element rather than a positive due to a plot twist, these things in my opinion cause Arm of the Sphinx to pale in comparison to Senlin Ascends. For most authors that would be a death sentence, but Bancroft is so talented that the story is still a delight in spite of this.

A lot of things I loved about the first book – the steampunk elements, figuring out how the Tower works (I was right on all counts as confirmed by this book), the unique settings, and wondrous moments – there’s still plenty of that to be found here. While the plot fairly bogs down and stagnates as Senlin becomes something of a joke and a side note, thanks to the other viewpoint characters (and Byron!) step up and the mysteries of the Tower and the Sphinx are revealed, I still did not want to put the book down. Another thing I appreciate is that it’s always easy to find a good stopping point when you only are able to sneak in quick batches of reading. And I loved how Bancroft, a self-admitted poet, paid homage to another poet by naming a character Byron.

The section of the book devoted to exploring The Zoo was perhaps for me the highlight of the book. This part of the story most closely resembles Senlin Ascends, with adventure, danger, intrigue, a touch of cleverness on the part of Senlin’s crew, and fair amounts of well-described action. I’ll not reveal too much here for fear of spoiling the plot…I’ll just say that it appears that The Hod King will return to this setting, and with a renewed focus on finding Senlin’s wife, I find that very intriguing.

Despite a host of problems, Arm of the Sphinx is still an exceptional story, told by a gifted writer. If I have one concern moving forward, it’s that Bancroft may have telegraphed his plot for The Hod King a bit too much. Hopefully the author surprises me with some twists and turns along the way, and I’ll be happy to be proven wrong. So I’m looking forward to The Hod King to see if it wraps up the series or if there will be more books, in order to see how it all turn out in the end…

Status Update 5-16-19

I have just completed reading David Benem’s The Wrath of Heroes. I’m really starting to fall behind on reviews but there’s just no help for it right now. As soon as my schedule eases up, hopefully I can knock out some of these backlogged reviews.

The Pages Read Count for the year is now 4654. Next up is James Islington’s An Echo of Things to Come, clocking in at a monstrous 716 pages…

A New Order, Hardcover Prices, and the Analog Experience in a Digital Age

I was originally just going to do a quick post on a book acquisition, but as I was thinking about the experience, the post began to evolve into something more, and then it morphed again. There’s a lot to unpack here, so I’ll take this one subject at a time and hopefully it will be fairly coherent.

Recently I decided to pick up the last book I needed in the Malazan the Fallen series by Steven Erikson, The Crippled God. I now have the complete series in hardcover, including the Ian C. Esslemont companion books, though I do not have the prequels or other ancillary novels. I thought The Crippled God would be the easiest book for me to find from the main series, since it was the most recently published, in 2011. I remember the buzz back in 2011 among those who were waiting for this book release to wrap up the series. But in my search for this book, what I had expected to find, and what I actually found, were two completely different things.

Throughout my experiences in acquiring the Malazan books, both from Erikson and Esslemont, I found it incredibly difficult to obtain a hardcover book for a reasonable price that was not a library copy, marked up, or missing the dust jacket, while buying from a trusted seller. I used to be able to go to Powell’s Books in Portland to find used hardcovers, but they now mostly stock new releases in hardcover, and seem to rarely have the older hardcovers I’m looking for. Most of the other used bookstores in my area are gone, and those that remain primarily stock paperbacks. So I had turned to Amazon and eBay to try to acquire the books. I discovered that in most cases, books could be found, but it was likely to cost me dearly.

For example, look at this list of hardcovers available for The Crippled God on Amazon:

the crippled god

As you can see, a new hardcover of this book starts at $123, so it was imperative that I find an affordable, used copy. When following the link to the used copies, of which there are 10, the following information is presented:

crippled god list

There’s a few things to note here. Ideally I look for “Used – Very Good” condition. Why is that? Check out Amazon’s definition of “Used – Good”:

All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include “From the library of” labels. Shrink wrap, dust covers, or boxed set case may be missing. Item may be missing bundled media.

I put emphasis on parts of this description because they are pretty important to me. Has the book been written on or had text highlighted? Does it have labels, a library stamp, or even a library checkout sleeve inside the front cover? Does it have the dust cover? In their descriptions, some sellers describe wear, markings and highlighting; others say that wear and markings/highlighting “may” exist (that’s not very helpful), and some sellers do not provide a good description at all. None state that the dust jacket is included, so it is impossible to know if you will receive one or not. Price is also a factor, with the two cheapest copies selling for around $30. A “used – very  good” condition starts at $50 (when including shipping and tax) to over $120 (the two most expensive copies wouldn’t fit in the screen capture). That’s a tough cost to swallow considering that the original list price was $29, and as established above for “used – good”, the quality of what you get is going to be a crapshoot. The final important factor is the rating of each seller. The first seller has the best rating at 93%, but that’s not great. Most sellers here fall between 91% and 88%. I generally don’t trust any sellers with a rating below 97%.

In the end I took a chance on a copy from eBay for a total of $17 and received a beautiful book, with very little wear, no markings, and the dust cover intact. eBay can be just as nebulous as Amazon, with lackluster descriptions, and in some cases the seller doesn’t even list whether the book is a paperback or hardcover! In this case I got lucky, as the next cheapest hardcover copy on eBay is $26 from a high volume seller with lots of negative feedback. After that the prices go much higher.

Here’s a couple other examples of costly Malazan hardcover acquisitions featuring Esslemont titles. Return of the Crimson Guard had a list price of $28 on release. Now if you want a new hardcover, prepare to pay over $162 plus tax. Last year there was one listed for almost $4000 (it has since been removed).

rotcg

For a “Used – Very Good” copy, the price begins at $60 and goes up from there.

rotcg list

One final example comes from Esslemont’s Blood and Bone. Again, the list price was $29, but in an unusual twist, there are no hardcover editions to be found on Amazon except for a signed slipcase version with some bland cover art for $78+. eBay often parallels Amazon, and I only found one hardcover, in “Used – Good” condition for $66 there. It’s nice to know that my hardcovers have some value to them, while my paperbacks are virtually worthless monetarily (but still have entertainment value to me). I was fortunate to win my hardcover copy of Blood and Bone in a contest at Fantasy Literature.

blood and bone
no hardcover available…

I’ve talked before a little bit about why I like hardcover books…how the larger print makes them easier to read, and there’s something about the tangible feel of holding a real book in my hands that just feels good. I call this an “Analog Experience in a Digital Age”. The more our experiences are converted to digital, the more nostalgia there is for physical , or analog, experiences, even among those experiencing it for the first time. One example of this is in my other hobby, pinball. Pinball nearly died in 2000 when competition from digital video games forced the biggest pinball company, Bally/Williams, to turn to slot machines, which were far more profitable. However, pinball has made a big resurgence thanks to its analog experience, with much of it coming from younger players who are largely unaware of its near death 20 years ago. A physical ball careens chaotically around a playfield and provides a feeling that just can’t be captured by digital games. And speaking of slot machines, that’s another example of nostalgia for analog…many people who play slots confess that they miss the spinning reels and the sound of coins paying out into the coin holder, because now slot machines are essentially a video game that doesn’t use coins, plays a jingle upon winning, and prints winnings on a piece of paper.

As far back as 2014 (and even early by some accounts), articles were being written about the demise of the paper book, with e-readers being touted as the future of publishing. In this article by the Economist (registration required), it explains that hardcover editions have traditionally been published first due to their ability to generate more profits than paperbacks. The author contends that the premium quality of a hardback is not challenged by e-readers; if anything, it is the paperback format that is threatened by its digital counterpart.

In this article from 2016 by the BBC titled “Are paper books really disappearing?”, it talked about the emergence of the e-reader, the bankruptcy of Borders, and predicts that reading books will be an unusual activity by 2026, although it hopes that we will be a “bi-literate” society – one that values both the digital and printed word. However, in direct contrast to the BBC articles stands this one from Inc. that was published over a year later, titled “7 Reasons Why Ebook Sales Are Falling–and Print Book Sales Are Rising Again”. It cites declining e-book sales and rising print sales as the basis for the article, although it cautions whether these numbers are a one-time phenomenon or actually will be the start of a trend. The author talks about what he likes about hardcover books, including how a physical book makes a more meaningful gift and how they are not “device-dependent”.

One of my favorite articles on this topic is by David Farrer of The Quad, who (satirically, mostly) lists the top 50 reasons why printed books are vastly superior to Ebooks. Here are some of my favorite reasons:

1. Zombie Apocalypse Test
When the zombie apocalypse knocks out the electricity in town and the internet is down, your books will still work just fine. You might even be able to fight off a zombie or two by swinging a sizable Oxford Dictionary.

4. Feel Your Progress
You can physically feel your progress through a book as the upcoming pages get fewer and fewer. Not so with ebooks.

11. Decoration
Books aren’t just for reading, they also decorate your walls and nightstands (and stairs, and floors, and counters, and rafters, and chimneys, etc.). Even as decoration, books breathe an air of intelligence into the room — unless it’s the Twilight series.

14. Haptic/Tactile Pleasure
Books have a feel to them, with texture, thickness, and weight. There’s more interactivity with the physicality of the book than there is with an E-Reader. Many people find the “feel” of books more satisfying and nostalgic than with ebooks (see, Baron, Words On Screen, pg. 142–7). Compared to the substantial tactile experience of books, a thin little E-Reader feels like a toy.

47. Artifacts
Books are artifacts, tangible human creations. Books are the stuff of archeology, history, and anthropology. They are part of our physical culture. Ebooks carry information, and they are fine for what they are, but they aren’t suited for museum displays. They aren’t precious expensive artifacts of bygone civilizations. They aren’t mementos of important times in our life, or childhood memories. Compared to books, ebooks are ephemeral wind.

I hope I’ve captured here why I prefer hardcover books and also why I have avoided e-readers to date. Most of all, I’m glad my Malazan collection is complete…