Status Update 12-2-19

Last week I completed City of Light, the third and final book in the Traveler’s Gate series. I really struggled with this one and took me almost the entire month of November to get through it. The Pages Read count for the year is now 9622. While it’s looking highly unlikely that I’m going to meet my reading goal, I think I’ll be making a serious run at it while I am out for a couple of weeks for surgery and will be laying in bed with nothing to do but read.

I’m continuing to have trouble with WordPress on my home PC: I open up my site only to find a blank screen. It’s making updating the site and writing reviews impossible. So starting next week I may not be able to post anything until January. I’ve got an email into WordPress to see if they can help me figure out what’s wrong.

Up next: I’ve started The Disappearance of Winter’s Daughter by Michael J. Sullivan, the fourth book in the Riyria Chronicles. I haven’t seen Kickstarter from Mr. Sullivan for another Riyria Chronicles book (he’s been busy writing his First Empire series), so it’s possible I’ll get to the original Riyria Revelations series sometime in 2020…

Book Review: Pulled Spat Knocked – The Amra Thetys Omnibus by Michael McClung (Part One)

pulled

Format: oversized omnibus paperback

Pages: 210

Reading Time: about 5.5 hours

One Sentence Synopsis: The thief Amra Thetys must avoid getting killed by foes both mundane and supernatural to avenge her dead friend and recover a powerful artifact before her enemies do.

 

I struggled a bit with how to approach a review for this title. The Amra Thetys Omnibus is actually a collection of three books: The Thief Who Pulled On Trouble’s Braids, The Thief Who Spat In Luck’s Good Eye, and The Thief Who Knocked On Sorrow’s Gate. Each of these stories was a self-contained, self-published work by Michael McClung, and were combined into one volume to make this Omnibus. I’ll admit that I’m not typically a fan of the omnibus format…I normally prefer to read each story on its own. In this case, however, as a self-published series of books, they were easier to obtain through the Omnibus than to try to chase down physical copies of each story. Since I can be lazy at times I took the easy way out with the Omnibus. McClung, despite scoring a publishing deal, has since had issues with his publisher and has returned to self-publishing, so I’ll need to learn what to purchase in the future that bests supports the author.

Unfortunately I could not find any reviews of the Omnibus edition itself other than Amazon or Goodreads. Therefore I decided to post this as a series of three separate and shorter-than-normal reviews, with each review focusing on one of the stories, and at the end of the final review, some additional thoughts on the Omnibus format itself.

Here, then, is Part One of the Omnibus review, The Thief Who Pulled on Trouble’s Braids, and guest reviews from around the Internet:

 

Richard Bray of Fantasy Faction states: “At 210 pages, The Thief Who Pulled on Trouble’s Braids isn’t trying to be the next bookshelf-bending epic fantasy that changes the way you think about the genre. Instead, it’s a straight-forward adventure noir featuring a touch of action, a bit of mystery and a wealth of interesting characters…Amra relays her story with a touch of world-weary cynicism combined with a quick, sarcastic wit. She’s tough as nails and takes a lone-wolf-against-the-world approach to everything, but as her story progresses, we find that she has plenty of friends willing to offer assistance as she needs it…As someone who enjoys noir mysteries where the protagonist follows lead after lead, getting themselves bruised and bloodied in their quest for the truth, this book was right up my alley…McClung doesn’t spend a great deal of time describing the city or trying to make it feel different from your stock fantasy city (though his take on the city’s funeral ceremonies – complete with a final meal with the dead, professional mourners and a demon guardian who makes certain the dead need not fear grave robbers – proves to be fascinating). Instead, he relies on a steady assortment of characters to make the city feel alive and create our interest in the setting…McClung relies upon the people to make this city different from any other. The never-ending forward momentum of the plot means we never linger too long on any one character or portion of the city – instead, we’re always meeting someone new or discovering some small detail about the city that helps to flesh out the setting as the story moves ahead…This is a self-published novel, and there are a few typos and errors in the text…Fortunately, the text is mostly clean, and the writing is strong enough that for the most part the lack of a publishing house’s editing team doesn’t detract from the experience or pull the reader out of the story.

Chris at Sci-Fi and Fantasy Reviews says: “Amra’s world is one of active magic, one where a cataclysm wiped out a major civilisation, and left survivors scrabbling to rebuild. There’s a fair amount of social construction under the surface – allusions to mass migration of refuges after a total disaster, for example. There’s also a fair amount of history, which is quietly laced through dialogue and world description – the odd mysterious ruin, references to long-ago conflicts, and so on…There’s a vibrancy and energy coming off the page from the environs – they’re plausible, detailed, complex, and suggest a living, breathing world around the protagonist. Amra, as a protagonist, is rather a lot of fun. She’s smart, quick, and interesting. Not a moral character, per se, but one with deep loyalties to friends. She’s a charming, pragmatic rogue, with a penchant for one-liners, and the ability to fight her way out of at least some of the sticky situations she ends up in. Over the course of the text, her loyalties are tested a little, and the reader gets to see her expand outside of her behavioural comfort zone – taking on a wider view, perhaps…I rather liked the competent, smooth, and somewhat dangerous feeling police inspector, and there’s a nobleman or two on the page who manage not to be total idiots in some fashion or other, which is rather nice. The feel from the villains is, in a lot of ways, more absolute – trying to get into their morals and motives is left secondary to watching them scheme, rampage, and generally slither in and cause havoc…The plot – ah, I did love this. It feels like someone took a dram of Chandler and a soupcon of Hammett, and blended them into this fantasy world. The noir themes are strong, and there’s a delightful string of byzantine crosses, double crosses and triple crosses. Motivations are obscured, trust is hard to come by, and everyone seems to be looking out for number one. Then there’s some brilliant chase scenes, a sense of high stakes wrapped within an intriguing mystery – and a feeling that no-one and nothing is quite what it seems. Is it worth reading? Emphatically yes. It’s a clever, high energy book, with an absolutely top flight protagonist, and a plot which kicks off from the first page, and didn’t let me put it down thereafter.

David S. at Fan Fi Addict opines: “Starting off with intrigue and murder, the pace doesn’t let up for the 208 pages that it spans. There was never a point where I was bored or wanted to stop reading. I was always on the edge of my seat because even in the most mundane of situations our characters found themselves in there was always a hint of danger and the unknown. Fast paced, dark, and gritty at times, this was a ride worth taking. Michael McClung does a great job of building the world as he goes. I was really impressed by the amount of world building that he was able to get into such a small book…I will say that the magic is not explained in depth. The author does not go into great detail about it and you will not understand everything about it by the end of this book…There were times throughout this story that I laughed out loud, but I also just found myself smiling often. Amra’s humor especially was right up my alley and reminded me quite a bit of the irreverent and sarcastic characters of the Gentlemen Bastards series by Scott Lynch…Amra was a compelling character. A stubborn, brave thief with a conscience just trying to avenge one of her only friends. I found it very easy and enjoyable to follow her in first person and get to know her. We also get to learn about the world as a whole as she learns about it which I really enjoyed.

 

Perhaps no book exemplifies the recent success of self-published works more than The Thief Who Pulled On Trouble’s Braids. I have read and reviewed several books from Mark Lawrence’s SPFBO contests, but I have finally gotten around to tackling this first McClung book, which was the winner of the inaugural SPFBO. As I began reading, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that The Thief Who Pulled on Trouble’s Braids was not only a sword & sorcery style, but was also written in first person. In addition to the references the guest reviewers above have made, my personal feeling is that there are elements of Glen Cook’s Garrett P.I. series, Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files, Robert Asprin’s Thieves’ World, and Howard Andrew Jones’ Asim and Dabir stories. In addition, the city in which the story is placed feels like a blend of Cook’s Tunfaire and Thieves’ World’s Sanctuary. It’s a fully realized and believable setting that seems well thought out, if a little mundane…what I mean by that is that there isn’t really anything you’ll find in this city that hasn’t been thought of somewhere else, with the lone exception being the city cemetery – there’s definitely some unique things happening there.

Amra is a joy to read. Part Garrett P.I., part Harry Dresden, and most of all, a competent thief, she manages to maintain not only a sense of humor, but a self-deprecating sense of humor in spite of the scars she bears. She’s under no illusions about the damage she’s experienced and consciously acknowledges it, while at the same time dismissing it with a wry and sarcastic sense of humor. Dig deeper, though, and subconsciously it’s a big problem that affects her ability to trust others and make friends, while lovers are seemingly out of the question. She’s not all-powerful, or magical, or even the best fighter; however, what she does have is a will to survive, good instincts, a thorough knowledge of the thief’s craft, and the ability to understand motivation and spin it to her advantage. In short, she should be quite average and nothing special, and yet she’s an amazing character.

The supporting cast is a mixed bag. Her friend that is murdered isn’t in the story long enough for me to be invested in Amra’s quest for revenge, and that’s a problem. Other characters seem a bit two-dimensional, which is to be expected from a story of this size and that isn’t a problem. The mage Holgren, on the other hand, is a wonderfully developed supporting character and a great addition to the story. His actions and attitudes go a long way towards getting Amra where she needs to go in the story. In other books, sometimes the protagonist has a dependency on unbelievable events that get the plot where it needs to go; Holgren allows McClung to neatly sidestep that problem. Everything that happens here with regard to plot is neatly in place and makes sense.

Spoiler Alert!!! As the reader follows Amra’s quest for revenge, which fortunately turns into a fight for survival (as I mentioned above the revenge plot is a bit thin), we meet an assortment of shady characters and settings. One of my favorite scenes involves entering the lair of a crime boss. A later escapade involves demonology within a house outside the city, which in some ways reminded me of a scene in Fritz Leiber’s Lankhmar stories. But my favorite scene involved the aforementioned city cemetery. This leads to a satisfying ending in which Amra is transformed from ordinary to something else. We just don’t know it yet.

The Thief Who Pulled On Trouble’s Braids is a fun, if all too brief, romp through a great world McClung has created, and worthy of it’s historic SPFBO win. The influences are many, from noir detective stories to wild sword and sorcery tales, and yet McClung has put his own stamp on it by allowing us to see the world through Amra’s cynical eyes. I was thoroughly hooked by the story, and though there isn’t really anything groundbreaking here, it is nevertheless a compelling read that has me looking forward to the next story in the Omnibus with great relish…

Book Review: Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson

words of radianceFormat: hard cover, first edition, 2014

Pages: 1080 (not including appendices)

Reading Time: perhaps 28-30 hours???

One Sentence Synopsis: As the three main characters finally begin to interact with each other, the war with the Parshendi comes to a climax, just as the Assassin in White makes a return.

 

Brandon Sanderson’s The Way of Kings, the first book in the Stormlight Archive, blew me away and captivated me so completely that it ended up in my top 20 of books published prior to 2013…which is no small feat due to a staggering amount of contenders. The question for the sequel, Words of Radiance would be: do I dare raise my expectations of how awesome I think this book should be? Read on to find out what happens, noting that there will be some spoilers, including a few for The Way of Kings. First, some guest reviews from the World Wide Web:

 

Carl Engle-Laird of Tor.com writes: “Shallan Davar, whose backstory we learn in Words of Radiance, was already my favorite main character in this series, and this is her book through-and-through. I know that many fans dislike Shallan, finding her childish or flippant, or perhaps just boring. And while I’m sure many might still dislike her once this book is finished, I doubt there will be many readers who don’t come to respect her. Her backstory is heartbreakingly poignant. Sanderson masterfully weaves her dialogue with her past throughout the narrative, bringing her conflicted self-image into stark relief. As I read through the book, the pressure of her backstory grew and grew. Even when it became clear what Sanderson was going to reveal, the anticipation was not relieved. I teetered on the edge, waiting for the book to come out and say the devastating facts that I knew were coming, waiting for her to admit the terrors of her past. Even as we reel at Shallan’s past, she faces challenges from every direction in the present. Words of Radiance cranks up the level of intrigue to dizzying extremes, picking up all the plots from the end of The Way of Kings and introducing even more. Where Way of Kings portends, Words of Radiance delivers, resulting in a much faster pace. Brandon Sanderson has shored up the biggest weakness of the first book, showing once again that he can write page-turners with the best of them, even on a massive door-stopper scale..The book isn’t without its flaws. First, some characters get a lot less attention. Dalinar in particular is a much less frequent viewpoint character, with Adolin taking up much of his page-time. Adolin has improved greatly between books, but it’s sad to see Dalinar stepping back from the action. This is made worse by the fact that much of the tension in Words of Radiance is derived by characters’ unwillingness to talk to each other. Even when justified by character prejudices, as is the case in this work, I hate this device. Kaladin spends almost the entire book being a paranoid jerk who won’t admit his fears or suspicions to anyone, and it just makes me want to shake him. I can’t help but feel that Sanderson could have provided less irritating motivations…For every cultural assumption, Sanderson has provided an opportunity for re-evaluation, questioning, dissent. He shows how the systems of this world developed, and where they’ve gone wrong. Alethi culture in its present form is sexist, classist, racist, and oppressive, and we are invested in its survival. But Sanderson has provided his characters with abundant grounds to question their cultural prejudices, and shaken the roots of the system enough to enable change. I can’t tell you how much I look forward to that pay-off.

Dina of SFF Book Reviews states: “If The Way of Kings was Kaladin’s book, this is clearly Shallan’s. The story continues seamlessly from where the first book left off, continues and (finally!) intertwines Kaladin, Shallan, and Dalinar’s tales, and answers some burning questions, while throwing up a whole bunch of new ones. Oh, and did I mention the epic battles, powerful magic, lovely bickering, and world-building? Well, you’ll get all of that too for the price of one book…What at first appeared to be random or existed by evolution turns out to have more complex backgrounds and it was so much fun discovering how new information made events from the first book appear in a different light. We learn a lot about spren, about what is probably the Big Bad for our heroes to fight, about history and culture in Roshar… oh man, there is seriously so much to discover. I especially liked the interludes which usually have nothing to do with the main story but are put in as an added world-building bonus, if you like. As I said, this was Shallan’s book, and just like we got Kaladin flashbacks in The Way of Kings, we get Shallan flashbacks in this one, fleshing out her past, her reasons for hunting down Jasnah Kholin, and more information about Shallan’s family. Some of these were not surprising, but there were a few revelations that I found quite chilling. And knowing what Shallan has gone through makes her character all the more impressive. The way Kaladin deals with grief (and he’s had his share of that!) is very different from how Shallan deals with hers, but I liked both of them better for it.

Mike of King of the Nerds says: “The characters readers came to know and love in the first book return here and while Shallan and Kaladin take the fore Sanderson manages to delve into and further explore a host of other characters including Adolin, Dalinar, Navani, Renarin, Jasnah and countless others. Sanderson really puts Kaladin through the ringer again here. Where the bridge runs in the previous book served as a sort of galvanizing force for Kaladin the sudden shift towards providing protection for Dalinar and his family rocks Kaladin back on his heels. Torn between duty and his own anger Kaladin is an extremely troubled figure throughout the entire novel. Perhaps the most standout character of the novel was Shallan. Over the course of the novel readers get to see the tragic events that lead to her quest to steal Jasnah’s soulcaster while during the present narrative we witness Shallan playing a dangerous game of cat and mouse with the Ghostbloods; a mysterious group who were responsible for the death of Gavilar.  Sanderson delves deeper into the culture of the Parshendi through the character of Eshonai; a Parshendi shardbearer. They are a fascinating society and her arc, seen first in the novel’s interludes, is particularly fascinating given the revelations about the parshmen in Way of Kings. Sanderson strikes an even tone during Eshonai’s chapters revealing how the war to avenge Gavilar’s death has worn on her people. While the war is the result of her people’s action there is a touch of the tragic to her tale as you witness a people willing to go to extreme lengths to ensure their own survival…Words of Radiance is quite frankly the definition of epic fantasy. Sanderson is writer who improves with each new novel he releases and Words of Radiance is his strongest release yet. Clocking in at over 1000 pages it is a novel that never lags; not once. Even in the moments when it slows down you are left, mind racing, trying to figure out how each new revelation and every new character fits into the larger frame of the story that Sanderson is weaving. If you’ve yet to start The Stormlight Archive now is that time.

 

I’ve explained many times that I don’t like flashbacks. They’ve become so trendy, the “in” thing to do, that almost everyone does it. And I’m so against anything that’s in or trendy. Forge your own path! The use of flashbacks are taken to extremes by Sanderson in The Stormlight Archive, with the main characters flashing back to events in their own lives, while Dalinar has additional flashbacks of other lives and events in the distant past. In Words of Radiance it is Shallan who is the focus of the character flashbacks. I will grudgingly admit that the flashbacks are used effectively here, not only adding depth to Shallan’s character and making her more sympathetic, but also giving the reader multiple “A-ha!” moments when we find out what exactly happened to her, and her family, in the past.

When looking back at my review of The Way of Kings, I noted that Shallan’s character was a mixed bag and wondered whether or not the pages devoted to her narrative were justified. I needn’t have worried. Shallan is the star of this book, and as I mentioned above, she becomes integral to the main plot. In fact, Sanderson does a great job of redeeming her character to the point of being more compelling than everyone else. She’s clever, has good instincts, and has luck on her side to help the plot along on a few occasions. And when it comes to compelling characters, you have to add Adolin to the mix, as more page time definitely helps his character develop from one dimensional to something more complex. Even his brother Renarin gets a welcome boost in development. All three of the main character viewpoints converge in this book, which is a welcome event, as Shallan’s physical distance from the others previously made her story harder to follow.

Unfortunately the focus on Shallan comes at the expense of the other viewpoint characters. Dalinar actually has very little page time in the book, although I’ve read that he is the main focus of Oathbringer, which makes a lot of sense. In Words of Radiance, Kaladin comes across as rigid, envious, and paranoid for much of the first half of the story, which is at odds with his personality in the first book. I suppose you could say that he now has much more to live for, hence the personality shift. However, the old Kaladin returns in the later chapters during a brilliant arena scene that I won’t spoil, but it is one of the highlights of the story. He also is really the true hero of this tale, and his importance is never greater than when the war with the Pashendi reaches a climax while at the same time the Assassin in White appears, resulting in a thrilling ending that goes on for pages and pages as viewpoints switch, the stakes get higher and higher, and the pace becomes frantic.

As Mike mentions in his review, adding an “alien” viewpoint character in Eshonai, one of the Parshendi, allows Sanderson to explore the differences and motivations behind their culture, which also goes a long way towards understanding them as a people rather than just casting them as a one-dimensional villain. In addition, it helps give a boost to Sanderson’s world-building, which he has always been quite adept at. I does bear worth mentioning again (as I explained during The Way of Kings) that Sanderson seems a bit limited in how he has built his heroes. What I mean is, between this series and Mistborn, his characters only seem capable of running fast, jumping high, pushing, pulling, etc. Perhaps that’s by design since all of these stories are part of Sanderson’s overall “Cosmere”, or related worlds, but rarely does Sanderson bother to delve into tactics, swordplay, or anything else beyond applying superhuman abilities. It does lend a “been here, done that” type of feel to the action if you’ve read the Mistborn series.

Minor Spoilers ahead! One thing I really like about Sanderson’s plot in this book, and the series, is that he’s not afraid to discard everything he has set up in the first two books, with eight more books still to come. The war with the Parshendi largely dominates the focus of the first two books, but that ends as Words of Radiance comes to a close. The scope of the series and the plot becomes more complex and convoluted by the end of the story. Who are the bad guys here? What is their motivation? Where is the plot going from here now that the Parshendi storyline has been wrapped up? What role do the Spren have to play? While a small bit of clarity is gained, Sanderson, in typical fashion, never lays all his cards out on the table and surely has some twists and surprises up his sleeve.

Clocking in at a whopping 1080 pages (not including appendices), which is almost 10% more than The Way of Kings, readers are looking at an intimidating 2000+ page count just from the first two books in the series. However, like The Way of Kings, I never felt like getting through over 1000+ pages in Words of Radiance was a chore. The pages seem to fly by thanks to a brisk pace and there really isn’t a lot of filler, except perhaps for interludes that explore ancillary characters and settings, but even those are appreciated for their contributions in worldbuilding as Dina mentions in her review. Even when there’s no action sequences happening, there’s plenty of intrigue to keep the reader’s interest high. I always mention when a book gives me frequent breaks in the reading so that there are plenty of stopping points, and that is true here…it’s easy to stop and pick up where the break is, if necessary.

There’s really not much more that I have to add besides what the guest reviews have expressed and what I’ve written. While it seems a disservice to this book to write such a short review for so many pages of material, the main takeaway is that while it didn’t completely captivate me like The Way of Kings did (I have a couple of other books rated higher for 2014), Words of Radiance is still a page-turner that I did not want to put down. The scope of this series is incredible, and despite an even bigger page count looming for Oathbringer (1248, a 20% increase!!!), I’m really looking forward to it…

Status Update 10-24-19

Today I completed Paternus: Wrath of Gods, the second book in Paternus series. The Pages Read count for the year is now 9236. It’s looking highly unlikely that I’m going to meet my reading goal, but that’s okay, the next two books will take me over 10,000 pages read for the year which is still a lot. And I have some time off coming up so who knows what will happen between now and the end of the year…

I am still working on a review of Brandon Sanderson’s Words of Radiance, but I’m having trouble with WordPress on my home PC, which has relegated my posts to the few breaks I get at work (in other words: very little time). Up next: City of Light by Will Wight, the third and final book in the Traveler’s Gate series.

New Orders 10-11-19

I’m slowly working my way through Paternus: Wrath of Gods. Unfortunately there’s not enough time to do much of anything else right now. I did manage to place an order for Jonathan French’s The True Bastards, the sequel to The Grey Bastards. It’s sad that I haven’t ordered many books that were released this year…

true bastards

Status Update 9-24-19

Today I completed The Labyrinth of Flame, the third and final book in The Shattered Sigil series. The Pages Read count for the year is now 8725 . It’s been a tough couple of months for reading due to great outdoor weather, but the weather is now turning wetter and colder, which usually leads to more reading. I am currently working on a review of Brandon Sanderson’s Words of Radiance. Up next: Paternus: Wrath of Gods, the sequel to Dyrk Ashton’s Paternus

Book Review: God of Broken Things by Cameron Johnston

God of Broken Things

Format:  paperback, first edition, 2019

Pages:  312

Reading Time:  about 8 hours

One Sentence Synopsis: Edrin Walker has survived a battle with gods and monsters and saved his city, only to find out that he must lead a suicide mission to his birthplace to fight off Skallgrim invaders, powerful creatures of horror…and his grandmother.

 

Cameron Johnston’s The Traitor God was tied for my top read of 2018, and absolute thrill ride that earns a spot in my all-time favorites. God of Broken Things is the sequel, in which Johnston promised that he would be “dialing up the monsters and magic to 12“. So was he successful? Read on to find out, but expect to encounter some spoilers, as well as several for The Traitor God, which I recommend you read before reading this review. For a good synopsis of the story, check out Mark Everett Stone’s review over at new york journal of books. Now, on to the guest reviews from cyberspace…

 

Dr. Dann Lewis of Grimdark Magazine says: “Johnston’s way with words is another thing that I must mention. The base description within the generic grimdark story revolves around “action, blood, sex, magic, monsters, more action, blood, and more sex”. At times there is little to no nuisance, and this is where Johnston excels above his luminaries. To read passages such as: ‘The Scarrabus shrieked in rage…as their god-beast fell to earth, burning and unconscious, its vast mind a fragmented thing drained of all magic…they slammed through the skin of the world and its fiery blood spewed into the sky’ and ‘flesh burst in a welter of blood and from his insides a god came forth…my guts churned and my Gift burned as if I stood too close to an inferno’, not only depict the world as gritty and dark, but as magical, volatile, and bleak. Broken Things is filled to the brim with such little details that build upon Johnston’s already wonderful world…Whilst I thoroughly enjoyed Broken Things, there were some parts that detracted from Johnston’s novel. The language itself was a little derivative and while his description and worldbuilding was spot on, the characters’ vernacular and narration was, at times, tedious. This was disappointing and distracted me considerably as, more often than not, wonderful tidbits of detail was placed next to lines such as ‘Oh. Fucking. Shite. I suddenly needed to piss. Badly.’. The wittiness and banter does add a layer of levity much needed in Broken Things, but there were many instances where the levity took on a life of its own. The swearing did also border on being quite juvenile and not befitting such a fantasy realm, but that may in fact be a personal qualm of mine. The characters were, unfortunately, mostly forgettable, though that might be the fault of being in the shoes of Edrin Walker. As a first-person novel, the reader is beholden to whatever the protagonist wants to see, feel, taste, and describe, and this in no exception in Broken Things.

Nick T. Borrelli of Out Of This World SFF Reviews states: “Where the first book was more of a slow-burn that focused on Edrin in somewhat of a detective role trying to uncover the identity of the murderer of his best friend, GOD OF BROKEN THINGS puts a boot on your throat from page one and never lets up. It’s very rare that you get a second book that actually has even more action and thrills than the first, but this fits that bill. Normally second books are methodical and used as a setup for the breathtaking and riveting final book finish. Yeah, not so much here…Johnston has just gotten better and better as a storyteller and his characters continue to have incredible depth and personality that you don’t see in many fantasy books these days. Yes, Edrin is still a wiseguy who believes he can get out of any situation, but he also has a vulnerability that makes him sympathetic and endearing. ..The ruined city of Setharis is described in such amazing detail as we get to see and feel the devastation that led to its fall and the subsequent aftermath. Yet we also get a sense that it may rise again one day and here is where Johnston hints at a bit of hope in the midst of enormous hopelessness. I can’t say enough about how much I enjoyed this book.

Finally, T. Eric Bakutis of The Fantasy Hive opines: “On the surface, God of Broken Things is a war story, and the ways Johnston leverages his already interesting magic system into the punches and counterpunches of a running magical military battle is one of the most entertaining parts of the book. If there’s one thing Walker’s good at, it’s coming up with nasty tricks and traps to slay his enemies, yet this time, the enemy is just as devious and clever as he is. Worse yet, Walker has traitors within his ranks waiting to backstab him the moment they get the chance. The running battles of the book are a highlight that showcase Johnston’s cool magic system. However, Johnston’s book is much more than a series of riveting battles and explosions. As Walker’s situation gets more desperate, we gain further insight into the events that shaped him into the dickish yet sympathetic jerk he’s become. We also (finally!) learn the true origin of Walker’s demon dagger and his history with his witchy brethren, and watch him move beyond vengeance to truly caring about people outside of his circle of friends. He grows both as a person and a leader. By the time the book careens toward its close, the stakes have risen beyond even Walker’s worse fears. The final clash between Walker and the leader of the opposing army is as epic as the flesh kaiju battle from the first book, and just as satisfying. And as is typical for Walker, the choices he makes in the end leave almost everyone incredibly pissed off, which is just the way he’d want it…If you enjoy bloody, highly tactical magic battles, a slow burn demonic history reveal, and a grumpy and relatable jerk who you can’t help but root for despite his flaws, God of Broken Things is your jam.

 

The city of Setharsis as a setting appears as a fraction of the story this time around, as Edrin Walker heads out to the mountains of the Clanholds to do battle with the invading Skallgrim. I found this slightly disappointing, as the open terrain is an inferior setting compared to that of Walker’s hometown, which I absolutely loved in the first book. Also, in a setting of this magnitude, it’s impossible to maintain the insane pace of the first book, since there is much more traveling and strategic battle planning involved. Still, I applaud Johnston for trying something different from his first plot. Equivalent in many ways to our own Celt society, the Clanfolk seemed to be more than just barbarians despite their primitive beliefs and simple lifestyle. While there, we get a glimpse into Walker’s past (he grew up in the Clanholds), including the sadistic grandmother that caused so much damage to him when he was younger.

Walker travels with a group of misfit mages to aid him in his mission. This was possibly the least believable aspect of the story, as Walker’s quest is billed as a desperate attempt to stall the Scarrabus parasites, and yet the Arcanum gives him little assistance to get the job done, asking for volunteers to accompany him instead of assigning them. The volunteers that step forward are flawed just like Walker is, but their skills are complimentary to one another and the group ends up being greater than the sum of its parts. To add a bit of a twist and some mystery, an unknown member of the group is very likely a traitor, which is a problem that must be solved in the midst of trying to stop the Skallgrim invasion.

The supporting characters are fleshed out just enough to make you care about them, although each deserves a little more page time to explore their personality and past. In his review, Dr. Dann points out:

The characters were, unfortunately, mostly forgettable, though that might be the fault of being in the shoes of Edrin Walker. As a first-person novel, the reader is beholden to whatever the protagonist wants to see, feel, taste, and describe, and this in no exception in Broken Things.

This is a really great observation. When a supporting character in the story was lost, I had a feeling of disappointment, but not really grief, as I didn’t really bond as strongly to them as I would have with more development involved. One way that Johnston could have overcome this is through more interaction between Walker and his coterie. Through direct dialog, more of each character’s personality would come through, we’d learn more about their background and what makes them tick. Maybe we’re not supposed to care about them – Walker certainly doesn’t (for the most part) – but dammit, just because Walker doesn’t, that shouldn’t mean that I don’t. I wanted to feel the loss of these people, for their lives to matter more. I do want to thank Johnston for bringing back a prominent character that I really enjoyed in the first book, and one that I did care about…Johnston did well with that character, and no I won’t spoil it.

While the pacing is fine and the battle strategies and large scale combat taking place on open terrain are interesting, as I mentioned above the pacing isn’t as thrilling as that of the first book, and the plot is not as tight. In fact, there are several diversionary scenes, including interacting with gods and powerful beings on other planes of existence that take the story on an odd tangent. Combined with the downtime of traveling (since the landscape isn’t really anything groundbreaking), the book drags a bit more than The Traitor God.

Walker himself is still the snarky, self-preserving arse that he was in the first book, but you don’t go through what he did without some changes happening. Always the reluctant hero, he is a bit more willing to embrace the role this time around, and actually displays some leadership skills in running his band of misfits on their suicide mission. The ability to “think outside the box” and come up with clever solutions to problems while still maintaining his self-preservation motivation is quite the balancing act, and Johnston manages to pull it off, which is no simple feat.

The trio of enemies – Skallgrim, Scarrabus and Elder Tyrant – work well as a foil to Walker. And Walker’s meet up with his grandmother is satisfying as well. The ending was a bit predictable to me, and there’s something that I thought didn’t make sense. Here I will post a SPOILER ALERT – YOU SHOULD SKIP TO THE NEXT PARAGRAPH! After the battle, when Walker’s mind inhabits a new body, that body just vanishes from the battlefield, only to reappear later somewhere far away. I’m not really clear as to how this was possible, but maybe I just missed something?

In conclusion, I’d have to say that I really liked God of Broken Things. While I don’t think that Johnston was quite able to dial the magic and monsters up to 12, and that The Traitor God was a bit better, I still enjoyed this new story immensely. I know Johnston values honest critiques and I offer up some minor ones here to build him up, not tear him down. Walker is a dark and yet likable hero and narrator, and God of Broken Things could still end up being my favorite release in 2019. I’ve heard some people say they can’t wait for the next one, while others are stating that Edrin Walker’s tale ends here. On his blog (see the “Cameron Writes” link in my sidebar), Johnston drops some hints that this might indeed be the end. I would be disappointed by that, but I also think Johnston would never say never, and at some point he’ll have a new idea rolling around in his head while he’s smithing swords, drinking ale or walking among ruins. He did state on my site in the interview we did (prior to the release of The Traitor God) that “if only The Traitor God does well enough to get a book 2 & 3“, which means book 3 *is* possible. I hope that’s the case because I’d love to see more of Edrin Walker and Setharis in the future…